[cppx] Is C4099 really a sillywarning? (MSVC sillywarnings)

Evidently some people get to my blog by googling up C4099, the MSVC warning that you’ve used struct in one place and class in another place, for the same class. This is one of the alleged sillywarnings in my sillywarnings suppression header. But given e.g. the discussion at StackOverflow, is it really a sillywarning, or perhaps something to take seriously?

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[cppx] Exception translation, part II

In part I I showed how to use the cppx library’s exception translation support, which decouples the specification of how non-standard exceptions should be translated, from each routine’s invocation of such translation. The translation can be customized by dynamically installing and uninstalling exception translator routines. And essentially each routine that wants exception translation must use a catch (this will most often be a generic catch(...)) where it invokes cppx::rethrowAsStdX, which in turn invokes the installed exception translator routines and performs a default translation if none of them apply.

In this second part I discuss how that translation machinery works.

In part III I’ll discuss the support for installation and uninstallation of exception translator routines. And perhaps I’ll need a part IV to discuss the cppx exception types! Anyway, now, diving down into the code…

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[cppx] Exception translation, part I

MFC throws pointers, Xerces throws various types not derived from std::exception, and as I recall the Lotus Notes API throws integers. An interesting diversity. But as the Chinese curse goes: may you live in interesting times! Such non-standard exceptions generally require you to have multiple catches every place such an exception could otherwise escape to higher levels, or where you want to handle any exception with a given general meaning. It’s not that the designers have tried to be clever or that they’re out to get you: it’s just that these libraries stem from before C++ was standardized, i.e., before 1998.

One partial remedy is exception translation. Somehow arrange for any non-standard exception to be caught and result in some corresponding exception derived from std::exception. It does not solve all the problems – but it sure beats doing it by copy-n’-paste coding of exception handlers!

With C++98 exception translation cannot be completely centralized in a portable, reusable way. As far as I know that’s not possible even with the upcoming C++0x standard. But it’s possible to provide portable and application-independent support that does most of the job, and that provides a general convention that largely eliminates the chance of any non-standard exception slipping through, and that’s what I discuss here. [… More] Read all of this posting →

[cppx] Unique identifier values via std::type_info

Like my posting about cloning this posting about unique identifier values is in preparation for discussing the cppx library’s exception translation support. In short the aspect discussed here is how to let the calling code choose an id for a set of installed translators, so that it can remove them all in one operation (specifying that id). And the simplest id you have in C++ is a type with external linkage. You can obtain a unique-wrt.-comparisions id for a class from the typeid operator. The only problem is that that id, of type std::type_info, is not copyable and not generally comparable, so it can’t be used directly as a key in a std::map, say, and the standard fails to guarantee that you will always obtain the same std::type_info instance for the same type, so it’s a bit risky to use a pointer to that instance…

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[C++ basics] Five lesser known special cast operations

If you’re already familiar with casting to inaccessible base, disambiguation casts, casting to most derived object, casting to/from first member of a POD, and accessing the built-in address operator via a cast, then this blog entry is perhaps not for you. 🙂 It’s basics, but for some reason even seasoned C++ programmers are not always aware of all these special cast operations. This is about special case semantics, not syntax or general operations.

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[cppx] 3 ways to mix in a generic cloning implementation

To clone an object is to create a dynamically allocated copy of the object, of the same dynamic type, generally without knowing the exact dynamic type. The common way to do that is a virtual method, e.g. called clone, that simply invokes the type’s copy constructor. And the main problem with cloning in C++ is: how to reduce the extreme redundancy of zillions of essentially identical clone methods everywhere?

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[wordpress] stats broken – proof

[Latest, as of 10th June, just a few hours after posting: Oops, while the stats probably are somewhat broken, this purported “proof” is a mis-interpretation (and that could apply also to my earlier observation): the stats main page only shows the 10 most viewed pages. Argh. Is it better to add a comment like this, showing off my rush-to-conclusions error to all readers, or to silently delete the posting? I left the posting in place. In a way, my eror ilustrats my point that its extremely easy to make errors, especially based on invalid assumptions!]

In my earlier posting “wordpress: broken stats?” I conjectured that the WordPress number-of-views-of-your-blog stats are broken. I then found an instance where the number of views of a posting decreased from 1 to 0 (within the same day), but that’s a bit difficult to show visually! However, right now the stats of this blog offer self-contradicting information in the same page, so I took a snapshot of the screen: [… More] Read all of this posting →

[cppx] ZStr, an ownerhip transferring string type

The ZStr ownerhip transferring string class that I introduced in my first Xerces posting may have seemed like total overkill for the job. In C++98 it’s difficult to do correctly, and it requires some less-than-commonly available support machinery. And so if Xerces string handling was the only reason to do it, I wouldn’t have done it.

But once a string class like ZStr is available you (or at least I) find that it’s a natural first choice for many tasks. The beauty of it is that it allows you to defer the decision of trading efficiency for functionality, because the ownership can be transferred to an immutable sharing string type at any point. Or the string can be copied to a copying mutable string type like std::string, whatever.

With a type like ZStr, if you’re implementing library-like functionality, the decision of which “rich” string type does not have to be imposed on the client code. Instead of already trading away the efficiency you’re giving the client code the choice, including the choice of just using ZStr.

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[cppx] Xerces strings simplified by ownership, part II.

In part I of this series I discussed Xerces’ UTF16-based string representation, a common deallocation pitfall for such strings, and how to convert to and from such strings correctly by using C++ RAII techniques. For the RAII techniques I presented one solution using boost::shared_ptr, and one more efficient solution using a home-brewed ownership transfer class, cppx::Ownership. And I promised to next (i.e. in this installment) discuss how to do it even more efficiently by using wchar_t strings as the program’s native strings, and detecting the minimal amount of work needed for each conversion.

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[cppx] /W4, no warnings, part II! (Disabling MSVC sillywarnings)

My original posting on how to avoid MSVC sillywarnings seemed to be quite popular. I’ve now added suppression of two more sillywarnings. The first of these is so braindead as to be almost unbelievable, it’s like it’s directly from the Department of Dumb: for the example below the compiler first (incorrectly) warns that type S “can never be instantiated”, and then it (correctly) goes on to instantiate it…

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